The most attractive part of the life of a Wali is that which deals with his manners and customs as corresponding to those of the Holy Prophet and is in accord with 'Sunnah'. Hazrat Sheikh-ul-Islam, from the very beginning was devoted towards divine love and was engaged also in the service of mankind. He spent practically his whole life in such service to making especially in the educational and spiritual spheres.

In early life as a student during a year of famine in Baghdad, one day he felt very hungry. But he did not have any money to buy food. He was obliged therefore, to proceed towards the bank of the river Tigris to pick up some vegetables to satisfy his hunger. When he found something edible, he did not run ahead of the other hungry persons, who were around him, to first take and have it for himself. Such was his exemplary conduct, even when starving.

Once having been unsuccessful in his attempt to find any food, he returned to Baghdad in an exhausted condition and entered a mosque to take rest. There he found a stranger eating something. The stranger invited him to join and share the food, but he declined though he was on the point of starvation.

he stranger however requested Hazrat again to share his meal for the sake of Allah. Then only, he joined him. In the course of conversation the stranger learnt that he was Abdul Qadir of his own town Jilan, and was perturbed. He confessed to Hazrat that his mother had given him eight dinars to be given to him, but as he could not locate him in Baghdad and as he had no food for the last two days, he had that day purchased the meal out of that fund under such extreme circumstances.

He apologized and placed before Hazrat the balance in hand. Hazrat not only pardoned him, but returned to him the balance tendered, thereby depicting his benevolence.

Once in Baghdad deprived of substantial food for 20 days, he proceeded to the ruins of Aewan-I-Kisra to see if he could find any vegetable or edible roots. He preferred such search to seeking help from anyone, under any circumstances. When he reached there, he found about seventy Walis already there in that same search for food. He returned to town and did not consider it proper to remain there and thereby reduce the quantity that may be found. Upon reaching back to the town, he met an unknown person from his native place. The stranger delivered him some pieces of gold and silver stating that those were sent by the mother of Hazrat Sheikh, to be delivered to him. He took them and immediately went back to the ruins of Kisra and distributed these pieces of gold and silver to those Walis, retaining one, with which he purchased food, which he shared with other needy persons. What a rare example of benevolence indeed.

His whole life was devoted towards the service of the poor and he devoted more of his precious time to the poor, than to the rich. Whenever in a town while passing through its streets, the people would come out of their shops and houses, and would stand on both sides of the streets to greet him in their reverence.

Once his son Sheikh Abdur Razak was with him on a journey to Hijaz when they reached a village where Hazrat Sheikh desired to stay. Instead of staying in the village, he proceeded towards the surburb, where he saw an isolated tent in which an old man, his wife and their daughter were residing. Hazrat Sheikh asked his permission to camp in vicinity.

Soon the news of the arrival of Hazrat reached the village and the notables and 'Amirs' of the village came to Hazrat and requested him to come to their village and stay with them, but he declined to accept their offer. When his Murids, devotees, students and people of the neighbouring villages heard this, they rushed to see him. They then gifted various presents. The Hazrat graciously accepted them but gave them to the old man near whose tent Hazrat had preferred to stay. Obviously this act was done to improve the financial position and social status of the old man and his poor family, who were until then disallowed from living in the village itself. The effect of this act obliged the people of the village to shift him to the village and to allow him to live among them.

Hazrat had a very soft corner for the needy and he would not rest until their needs were fulfilled. Even after his demise, any prayer for spiritual help from Hazrat seldom met with disappointment. He was very fond of feeding people along with him. His door was always open for all. He would personally look after the needs of his guests. After evening prayers, his tablecloth would be spread and his personal attendants would announce dinner for his guests, whatever was the food available.

Sometimes, people with a desire for a particular dish would come to Hazrat. Once on his return from Hijaz after Hajj the famous preacher of Egypt Sheikh Zainuddin in 'Bhahjat-ul-Asrar', has narrated that he and his other companion wished mentally to have honey and milk dishes respectively at dinner. Meals were brought and when these were being served the servant placed honey before my companion and the milk dish before me. One seeing this Hazrat pointed out to his attendant to reverse the dishes, that is, the place honey before me and the milk dish before my companion as were mentally desired by us. Hazrat Ghous once said, 'I have explored the weight of every human action and have finally come to the conclusion that feeding of the poor and hungry is virtuous of all actions.'

He was always most polite and respectful to his visitors. Whenever, any one of them was absent for sometime, he would enquire particularly about him. In cases of indisposition he would visit the patients and pray for their health and happiness.

He disliked the company of 'Amirs' and rich men. Whenever the Khalifa or other 'Amirs' intended to come to Hazrat, he would get up from amongst those present and retire to his chambers. It has not been established by any writer so far that Hazrat Ghous had ever gone to see any Khalifa or Amir. On the contrary they used to come to Hazrat.

Khalifa Almustanjad Billah once came to him and presented him bags of gold. Hazrat Sheikh refused the gift. When the Khalifa begged and pleaded for the acceptance of the gift, Hazrat took two of the bags and pressed them. Blood seemed to ooze out of the bags of gold. He then addressed the Khalifa stating that his wealth had been amassed by oppressing the poor people.

Sometimes, people with a desire for a particular dish would come to Hazrat. Once on his return from Hijaz after Hajj the famous preacher of Egypt Sheikh Zainuddin in 'Bhahjat-ul-Asrar', has narrated that he and his other companion wished mentally to have honey and milk dishes respectively at dinner. Meals were brought and when these were being served the servant placed honey before my companion and the milk dish before me. One seeing this Hazrat pointed out to his attendant to reverse the dishes, that is, the place honey before me and the milk dish before my companion as were mentally desired by us. Hazrat Ghous once said, 'I have explored the weight of every human action and have finally come to the conclusion that feeding of the poor and hungry is virtuous of all actions.'

He was always most polite and respectful to his visitors. Whenever, any one of them was absent for sometime, he would enquire particularly about him. In cases of indisposition he would visit the patients and pray for their health and happiness.

He disliked the company of 'Amirs' and rich men. Whenever the Khalifa or other 'Amirs' intended to come to Hazrat, he would get up from amongst those present and retire to his chambers. It has not been established by any writer so far that Hazrat Ghous had ever gone to see any Khalifa or Amir. On the contrary they used to come to Hazrat.

Khalifa Almustanjad Billah once came to him and presented him bags of gold. Hazrat Sheikh refused the gift. When the Khalifa begged and pleaded for the acceptance of the gift, Hazrat took two of the bags and pressed them. Blood seemed to ooze out of the bags of gold. He then addressed the Khalifa stating that his wealth had been amassed by oppressing the poor people.

In addition to the daily preaching, he would deliver specific lectures thrice a week. These sermons were delivered at the Idgah on Friday mornings, at the Madresa on Tuesday nights, and at the Guest House, on Wednesday mornings. All categories of people attended these sermons, and included Sufis, Faqihs, Amirs, Khalifas, Rijal-ul-Ghaibs, Jins, Angels, Souls of the departed ones. Even non-Muslims attended these sermons and many of them subsequently embraced Islam.

Sinners, who listened to his discourses, reformed their lives. His sermon alone helped in the reformation of over one lac of evil doers, which included murderers and thieves, who repented their past sins and started to lead better lives. Without any fear, he publicly denounced the unjust acts of Khalifa Muqtaza-ai-Ammarallah who once appointed the notorious tyrant and dishonest person Abu Ofa to the post of a Qazi. The Hazrat disapproved this appointment and said that the Khalifa had committed a grave error in making this appointment and that he would have to account for his action in the near future before Allah. When the Khalifa heard of this admonition, he trembled with fear and dismissed the tyrant Qazi.

Addressing a date tree, in the yard of his Ribat as if it represented the ruling Khalifa Muqtaza-ai-Amarallah, he said that he would cut off its head if it should be refractory. On hearing of this, the Khalifa asked his minister, Ibn Habira to submit to Hazrat Sheikh, in private, that it was not proper for His Holiness to oppose a Khalifa, when he knew well the rights of the Khalifa. When Ibn Habira went to the Hazrat, he saw many persons sitting round him; hence he awaited an opportunity to speak to him in private. In the course of conversation, Hazrat told him that he would certainly cut off his head. The minister understood he good intentions and sincerity of the Hazrat. Ultimately the Khalifa himself came to Saiyidena Ghousul Azam and sat down respectfully. He then lectured the Khalifa and reproached him so severely that he burst into tears. Then Hazrat Sheikh treated him with kindness. The censure had the desired effect on account of the psychic powers of Hazrat.

Once in 528 A. H., Abdul Hasan Saeed was present at a meeting when Hazrat Ghous was delivering a sermon on Zumud (Renunciation). He thought within himself that he would like to hear a sermon on Mahifiat (gnosis). Hazrat Ghous suddenly changed his subject and spoke on marfat of such a high character that he had never before heard.

He then mentally desired to hear a sermon on Shawq (intense desire) to please God. Hazrat again changed his subject and spoke on 'Shawq' (intense) desire. His sermon on the subject was so excellent that he did not hear the one like it before. In this manner Abdul Hasan Saeed mentally desired to hear discourse on different subjects, and Hazrat spoke on subjects like annihilation and subsistence, and lastly on 'Hazuri' (Presence of heart in God) and 'Ghaibat' (absence from all things except Allah). After he had spoken on the last subject, he told Sheikh Abdul Hasan Saeed that, that enough had been spoken for him. Abdul Hasan lost his control and tore his garments.

One day Hazrat Abdul Wahab, son of Hazrat Ghous, on his return to Baghdad, after extensive travelling and acquiring knowledge in different branches of Islamic theology, and having obtained the previous permission of his father, sat on the chair of his father and delivered a scholarly speech. The lecture did not move the audience. The heart of none appeared to be emotionally affected. Many in the audience, then requested Hazrat Ghous his father, to speak. At this Hazrat Abdul Wahab got down and Hazrat Ghousul Azam occupied the chair.

Hazrat merely spoke on his daily routine. But these few words made the whole audience attentive. His son inquired the reason for having been able to arrest so quickly the attention of the audience of quite a formal discourse. At this, Hazrat replied to his son that he was proud of his travels, though he had yet to travel on a higher plane. Hazrat said 'when I ascended the chair, a spark from Providence flashed in my heart and I spoke in that state a few words, which naturally had such an affect on the audience'.

At first he began to preach in the Madresa made over to him by Hazrat Abu Saeed. In the beginning only two or three persons formed his audience. ; But on account of his profound learning, piety, spirituality, adherence to truth, strict observance of the 'Shariat', avoidance of 'Bidat' (innovations) and his eloquence, his fame spread through out the different quarters of Baghdad and all the Muslim world.

Crowds began to flock to hear his sermons. As there was not sufficient accommodation in the Madresa. People used to sit outside the Madresa on the road up to the entrance to the Serai. As the audience still increased the houses adjacent to the Madresa were acquired and the Madresa was extended in 528 A. H. Even then, the Madresa and its percents were not large enough for the audience. It was then in the Idgah outside the City, that Hazrat used to address mammoth audiences. Subsequently a monastery was built for this purpose, which was also known as Musafir Khana.

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